Simple Pico de Gallo Recipe

The hardest thing about making pico de gallo is chopping the vegetables. After you get over that hump, it is smooth sailing.

This simple pico de gallo recipe was taste-tested during my Om, Nom event over the weekend. First participants got sweaty in a vinyasa-inspired yoga bootcamp class, then everyone tasted my newest go-to breakfast: savory oatmeal.

On top of that lovely savory oatmeal was this vibrant pico de gallo. The recipe below nearly filled up two mason jars — which was perfect for the event. Though, if you are like me, you could probably eat an entire jar yourself.

Make it in your kitchen and tag #SHSHkitchen when you do!

Simple Pico de Gallo

  • Servings: 8-10, 2 Tbsp each
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

1 pint cherry tomatoes, cut small

1/2 red onion, diced

1/2 red pepper, diced

1/2 yellow or orange pepper

2-3 Tbsp of fresh cilantro, chopped

2-3 scallion stalks, chopped

1 lime

1/2 tsp sea salt

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Directions

  1. The worst part is first: Chopping the tomatoes. After rinsing the cherry tomatoes, chop each one into 6ths or 8ths depending on size. Use your best knife and exercise patience.
  2. After the tomatoes are chopped, move onto the onion and peppers. Chop them just as small as the tomatoes.
  3. Add all veggies to a mixing bowl. Then, add the chopped scallions and cilantro. Combine well.
  4. Juice the entire lime over the bowl,  add the sea salt and give your pico de gallo a toss.
  5. Cover and set in the fridge until serving time. Store it in an air-tight container for up to 3 days.

 

4-Ingredient Protein Pancakes

Pancakes are amazing — there’s no argument there (I hope). One of the best things about pancakes is that they can be vegan, gluten-free and dairy free and still taste delicious. These four-ingredient protein pancakes are the bee’s knees.

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I’ve seen several protein pancake recipes on Instagram and the blogs I follow, but I thought I’d share my personal go-to. As always, you can add your personal touches, i.e. cinnamon, fruit, cacao nibs, honey, maple syrup, nut butter, etc. Opting for a breakfast that is a great mix of protein, healthy fats and whole grains keeps you full throughout the morning and prevents that crash you experience after a sugary meal.

Try this recipe and tell me how you customize it!

Protein Pancake

(Serves 1)

Ingredients

1 banana

1 egg (vegans sub one flaxseed egg)

1/4 cup quick cook oats

1 scoop protein powder (I use Whole Foods’ whey protein, use vegan if needed)

1 tsp coconut oil

Pancake batter

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, mash your banana. In the same bowl, scramble your egg (or add flaxseed egg) and combine it with the mashed banana.
  2. Add oats, protein powder and any extras (i.e. cinnamon, stevia or vanilla) to your bowl. Mix well to make sure protein powder is fully incorporated.
  3. Let the batter sit for 5 minutes so that the oats absorb some of the liquid. In the meantime, heat 1 tsp of coconut oil in a small skillet over medium heat. If using a non-stick skillet, feel free to skip the oil.
  4. Pour batter into heated skillet. Flip once the pancake starts to bubble.

Serve drizzled with maple syrup or honey. Another great addition is a scoop of nut butter, fruit or cacao nibs. Enjoy!

Tofu Glass Noodles

Last week, I had this weird craving for these bean threads. You can find bean threads at an Asian food store — or in the international section of your favorite grocery store (usually you’ll see the Saifun brand I used here). Serve this dish hot or cold as a simple weekday lunch or dinner. From start to finish, it takes you less than 20 minutes.

Keep in mind — any of the veggies can be swapped out for what’s in your fridge. As you’ll see in the photos, I added some mushrooms (I needed to use them up), but mushrooms are not 0n the ingredient list.noodles

Tofu Glass Noodles

Serves 3-4
Ingredients

5-6 ounces dry glass noodles (I used Saifun bean threads)

2 Tbsp sesame oil

 3/4 package of firm tofu, cubed (How to Prepare Tofu)

1 Tbsp ginger, minced

2 garlic cloves, minced

3 large carrots, sliced into thin sticks

1 red bell pepper, sliced thing

1 bunch of kale, de-stemmed and roughly chopped

sesame seeds for garnish

Sauce for spicy noodles (this one is my favorite)

2 tsp garlic chili paste

2 Tbsp soy sauce

2 Tbsp rice vinegar

1 lime, juiced

Sauce for sweeter noodles

2 Tbsp. sweet chili sauce

2 Tbsp soy sauce

1 lime, juiced

Directions
  1. Noodles: Bring 6 cups of water to a boil (use an electric tea kettle — so easy!). Break the noodle bunches in half, place them in a large bowl and cover with boiling water for 10 minutes. Strain and divide into 3 or 4 serving bowls.
  2. Tofu: In a skillet, heat 1 Tbsp sesame oil (other oil works) over medium-high heat. Once hot, add cubed tofu and let it crisp. Fried it on each site until golden brown.noodles
  3. Veggies: In a separate skillet, heat 1 Tbsp sesame oil and then add ginger and garlic until fragrant. Add carrots, peppers and 1 Tbsp water. Cover and cook until they start to soften (like steaming them). After about 5 minutes, add kale and cook until it wilts.noodles
  4. Sauce: In a bowl, whisk together your sauce ingredients. If serving your dish hot, add your sauce to you veggies to warm it up in the next step. If serving cold, put sauce to the side for now. noodles
  5. Remove your veggies from heat and mix in the cooked tofu. If serving hot, mix in the sauce and tofu before removing from the heat. If serving cold, add sauce and let everything cool.
  6. Add the skillet ingredients to your noodles, toss gently and serve!
Stay healthy, stay happy!

Vegan Chickpea Coconut Curry

Cooking is my meditation — well, one of my many meditative practices. For me, meditation doesn’t necessarily require sitting quietly (though, that is most effective IMO). The whole purpose of meditation, in whatever form it takes, is to cultivate awareness and compassion.

Boston yogi, Rebecca Pacheco, describes it well:

It’s not possible to be bad at meditation.  There’s doing it and not doing it.  That’s all.  If you want to try: try.  And be assured that it doesn’t always look, sound, or feel Zen.  Sometimes, it feels wretched or boring or like nothing much at all.  It doesn’t matter how long or where you sit, whether roused by an antique Buddhist gong or iPhone.

 

All experiences of meditation are good and valuable because they cultivate the skill of being present, of strengthening the mind.

How often do you focus your attention on one thing or one task? When sitting in meditation, it’s about becoming still and maybe repeating a mantra to gain control of the mind and reach a heightened awareness.  On your yoga mat, it’s a matter of staying present and keeping your physically body and attention in the room. In Zumba class, it’s about staying engulfed in the rhythm, the movement and how your body feels as you move with the beat. In the kitchen, it’s about paying attention to the task at hand — slicing carefully, stirring thoughtfully and paying attention to the ingredients going into your body.

The goal of meditation is to become more aware of your physical and mental body — while also developing compassion, patience, generosity and forgiveness. The intended outcome of all things you do should be the same — to develop compassion, patience, generosity and forgiveness. This is especially true for the foods you fuel your body with, which is something I’ve been reading about in my Japanese home cooking book by Elizabeth Andoh, “Washoku: Recipes from the Japanese Home Kitchen.” Rhythm and flow in the kitchen is important — so is cooking with compassion.

Oh, you came here for a recipe?

The point of all of this is… I have found so much joy in cooking lately and I attribute that to the recent meditative nature of my work in the kitchen. I’m always attentive about what is going into my body (for many reasons), but I didn’t always engulf myself in the process. This recipe is based off of one from VeganSandra.curry

Chickpea Coconut Curry

Ingredients

1 Tbsp coconut oil

1 leek, just the whites sliced thin (or 1/2 white onion sliced thin)

1 tsp salt

2 tsp curry powder

1 tsp ground cumin

2 bay leaves

1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed

1 can of diced tomatoes

1, 14 oz can of coconut milk (I buy organic, light coconut milk from Trader Joe’s)

  1. In your soup pot, heat coconut oil over medium-high heat.
  2. Add thinly sliced leeks/onions and salt. Cook for one minute. Add curry, cumin and and bay leaves. Stir and cook for one minute. Add drained chickpeas and cook for another minute. Add the entire can of tomatoes and let it simmer for a couple of minutes.
  3. Open the can of coconut milk  stir vigorously. Add about 1/2 of the can to your pot and simmer for at least 5 minutes.
  4. Final step: Taste test your curry and add more coconut milk if it’s not coconut-y for you. Mine was plenty coconut-y without the rest of the can — but, everyone’s taste buds are different.

Serve alone or over a bed of rice with a drizzle of soy sauce (or tamari). Nom, nom, nom!curry